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Aston Martin DBS

Aston Martin?s new DBS, recently unveiled at the Pebble Beach Concours d?Elegance in California, came face-to-face with the Le Mans-winning DBR9, at an exclusive test day at the Nϋrburgring in late August.

The DBS was in Germany for a final sign-off drive at the Nϋrburgring?s Nordschleife circuit at the same time as the Aston Martin Racing DBR9 and other customer race teams were taking part in a test session on the Grand Prix circuit, creating an ideal opportunity for the two cars to meet. The DBS is scheduled to be officially launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September.

Image Aston Martin dates back as far as 1914 when Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford joined forces and formed a company. The name was taken from Martin?s success at the Aston hillclimb in central England. The first competition Aston Martin appeared in 1921 and in 1951 Aston Martin DB2s filled the first three places in class at the Le Mans 24-Hours.

Aston Martin was this year purchased from Ford Motor Co., which had first bought a substantial part of the company in 1987, by a consortium headed by Prodrive?s David Richards. As well as running the Subaru world rally team, with drivers Petter Solberg and Chris Atkinson, and the Aston Martin racing program in the FIA GT series, Prodrive is aiming to become the 12th Formula One team when it enters Grand Prix racing in 2008. Ongoing discussions suggest that Prodrive will become effectively a McLaren-Mercedes ?B? team, with both cars and engines sourced from McLaren. No details of sponsorship are available at the time of writing although Richards says that negotiations are going well so far. Rumors currently suggest that McLaren tester Pedro de la Rosa will be one of the drivers, with the other either Britain?s Gary Paffet or French-Canadian Bruno Spengler, both of whom currently compete in the German touring car series (DTM) with Mercedes-Benz.

The Aston Martin DBS adopts a series of race-derived materials and components, taking inspiration from the successful DBR9. The DBS is powered by an Aston Martin six-liter V12, an enhanced version of which is used in both the DBR9 and DBRS9 race cars. The shared powerplant continues the strong link between Aston Martin?s road and race cars, just as the six-cylinder engine used in the DBR1 inspired a generation of engines in the DB4, DB5 and DB6 in the 1950s and 60s.

Like the DB9, the DBS also uses Aston Martin?s all-alloy VH (Vertical Horizontal) architecture, a lightweight, bonded-aluminum structure that provides outstanding strength and rigidity. Aston Martin engineers have also employed advanced materials and processes to further reduce weight and increase the performance and dynamics of the DBS.

The DBS also has a revised dynamic stability control (DSC) system, designed to help maintain maximum traction in difficult driving conditions. The system incorporates a ?track? mode which raises the threshold at which the system intervenes to allow the experienced driver to explore the car?s limits.

The car?s braking system features another innovation: for the first time carbon ceramic matrix (CCM) brakes have been used on a road-going Aston Martin. The end result is shorter stopping distances with excellent resistance to fade. A further advantage of CCM brakes is that they are around12.5 kilos lighter than a conventional system, reducing the weight of the car overall and, in particular, the unsprung weight and rotational masses.

The DBS will be built at Aston Martin?s global headquarters at Gaydon in the UK, joining the current Aston Martin line-up, which now comprises the DB9, the agile V8 Vantage Coupe and the critically acclaimed Vantage Roadster which was launched this year.

Deliveries of the DBS are expected to commence in early 2008, with prices to be confirmed at the Frankfurt show.

Aston Martin DBS

Aston Martin?s new DBS, recently unveiled at the Pebble Beach Concours d?Elegance in California, came face-to-face with the Le Mans-winning DBR9, at an exclusive test day at the Nϋrburgring in late August.

The DBS was in Germany for a final sign-off drive at the Nϋrburgring?s Nordschleife circuit at the same time as the Aston Martin Racing DBR9 and other customer race teams were taking part in a test session on the Grand Prix circuit, creating an ideal opportunity for the two cars to meet. The DBS is scheduled to be officially launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September.

Aston Martin dates back as far as 1914 when Lionel Martin and Robert Bamford joined forces and formed a company. The name was taken from Martin?s success at the Aston hillclimb in central England. The first competition Aston Martin appeared in 1921 and in 1951 Aston Martin DB2s filled the first three places in class at the Le Mans 24-Hours.

Aston Martin was this year purchased from Ford Motor Co., which had first bought a substantial part of the company in 1987, by a consortium headed by Prodrive?s David Richards. As well as running the Subaru world rally team, with drivers Petter Solberg and Chris Atkinson, and the Aston Martin racing program in the FIA GT series, Prodrive is aiming to become the 12th Formula One team when it enters Grand Prix racing in 2008. Ongoing discussions suggest that Prodrive will become effectively a McLaren-Mercedes ?B? team, with both cars and engines sourced from McLaren. No details of sponsorship are available at the time of writing although Richards says that negotiations are going well so far. Rumors currently suggest that McLaren tester Pedro de la Rosa will be one of the drivers, with the other either Britain?s Gary Paffet or French-Canadian Bruno Spengler, both of whom currently compete in the German touring car series (DTM) with Mercedes-Benz.

The Aston Martin DBS adopts a series of race-derived materials and components, taking inspiration from the successful DBR9. The DBS is powered by an Aston Martin six-liter V12, an enhanced version of which is used in both the DBR9 and DBRS9 race cars. The shared powerplant continues the strong link between Aston Martin?s road and race cars, just as the six-cylinder engine used in the DBR1 inspired a generation of engines in the DB4, DB5 and DB6 in the 1950s and 60s.

Like the DB9, the DBS also uses Aston Martin?s all-alloy VH (Vertical Horizontal) architecture, a lightweight, bonded-aluminum structure that provides outstanding strength and rigidity. Aston Martin engineers have also employed advanced materials and processes to further reduce weight and increase the performance and dynamics of the DBS.

The DBS also has a revised dynamic stability control (DSC) system, designed to help maintain maximum traction in difficult driving conditions. The system incorporates a ?track? mode which raises the threshold at which the system intervenes to allow the experienced driver to explore the car?s limits.

The car?s braking system features another innovation: for the first time carbon ceramic matrix (CCM) brakes have been used on a road-going Aston Martin. The end result is shorter stopping distances with excellent resistance to fade. A further advantage of CCM brakes is that they are around12.5 kilos lighter than a conventional system, reducing the weight of the car overall and, in particular, the unsprung weight and rotational masses.

The DBS will be built at Aston Martin?s global headquarters at Gaydon in the UK, joining the current Aston Martin line-up, which now comprises the DB9, the agile V8 Vantage Coupe and the critically acclaimed Vantage Roadster which was launched this year.

Deliveries of the DBS are expected to commence in early 2008, with prices to be confirmed at the Frankfurt show.

 
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© 2018 Jeff Heselwood. All rights reserved.
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