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Volkswagen Eos PDF Print E-mail

The star of the recent Frankfurt motor show, Europe’s largest, was indisputably the Volkswagen Eos convertible-coupé (although if you are a Jaguar fan the new XK looks pretty tasty).  To go on sale worldwide in the Spring of 2006, the Eos is based on VW Passat and Golf technology – the chassis and power plants – but is a standalone model that was designed as a dual-purpose open or closed car.  Executive chairman of Volkswagen, Wolfgang Bernard said at the launch: “The Eos is not a compromise; a product that cannot make up its mind what it is.  It is a real convertible and a real coupé.”

Eos is derived from the Greek goddess of the dawn, but perhaps more significantly it is a name that can be enunciated in virtually any language; it is planned to sell the new car on all five continents and a simple name was considered essential, one that is phonetically obvious.  Eos the goddess, incidentally, was turned into a nymphomaniac by Aphrodite, the goddess of love, as some form of punishment …

The Volkswagen coupé-convertible follows in the tradition of the pioneering Peugeot 206 CC and the later Renault Mégane, but it must be said that as this type of motor car develops they are getting both more sophisticated and far better looking.  Compare the bug-like 206CC with the sleek lines of the new Eos.

Volkswagen Eos
Volkswagen Eos
Its makers claim the Eos to be the world’s first four-seater with a five-section CSC (convertible-sliding-coupé) roof.  Comprised of steel and glass sections, the CSC roof is opened and closed with a centrally mounted switch between the front seats, the entire process taking just 25 seconds.

Safety within this type of vehicle can be seriously compromised but Volkswagen has firmly addressed the issue, with a roll-over protection system that shoots forwards above the rear headrests within a quarter of a second after a predetermined level of lateral g is reached or severe vehicle inclination detected.  Four airbags are fitted, including side head-thorax bags.

To propel the Eos there are four gasoline engines and one turbodiesel.  Power outputs range between 113 bhp (85 kW) and 246 bhp (184 kW) – the gasoline engines – or 103 kW for the diesel lump.  The diesel is fitted with a particulate filter as standard equipment. The top-of-the-range 3.2 liter V6 Eos will reach a maximum of a shade under 250 km/h while the magic 0-100 km/h sprint is achieved in 7.3 seconds.  All engines are fitted with six-speed gearboxes, manual or auto, and drive the front wheels.

The Eos is being launched with only one high level of equipment.  Electronic stability control; alloy wheels; electric windows: all standard.  Options include a high-end Dynaudio sound system with a 10-channel amplifier and ten speakers producing a cacophonous 600 W of power, and bi-xenon headlights and cornering lamps.

Electrically operated ‘easy-entry’ front seats are fitted to allow access to the rear; these move forward at the push of a button, but ‘remember’ their previous positions for both driver and passenger, returning by pressing the same switch.  The trunk is reasonably capacious and even with the roof down will swallow a decent amount of luggage, although for obvious reasons the roof takes a significant amount of cargo space when lowered.  A power latching system for the trunk closes the lid the last few millimetres, while there is a lockable thru-loading aperture in the rear seat panel to allow longer items to be carried.

The Eos represents a departure for Volkswagen from its general range of cars for the masses but is expected to be a huge success, notably in Europe where the weather patterns do not always lend themselves to a conventional convertible.  Prices are expected to be in the area of 25,000 euros when it goes on sale in Germany next year.

 
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© 2018 Jeff Heselwood. All rights reserved.
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